Color My Teacher: an oral history of Black Cobb County educators

Marietta History Center taken from other side of railroad tracks

The Marietta History Center continues its Diverse Cobb programming with Color My Teacher, an oral history project featuring interviews with Black teachers, counselors and principals.

The showing will last through October 1, and features educators J. Carter, Vanessa James, Mildred Howard, Preston Howard, Stephanie Howard, Sunday Wilson, James Wilson, Bill Scott, Gwen Hall, Pat McGregor, Gerald McFry, Lynn McBride and Josetta Walker.

The series was created by Tim Penn.

Penn previously produced the Lemon Street Chronicles, an oral history of students who attended the Lemon Street Schools in Marietta.

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According to the announcement on the City of Marietta website:

The Marietta History Center is proud to be showcasing a new educator interview each week. This project has been made possible by the generous support from Heritage Funeral Home & Chapel, the Cobb Sheriff’s Foundation and the Sherry Harris Agency.

The Marietta History Center is located at 1 Depot Street, Marietta, GA 30060

The hours of the showing are Tuesday – Saturday 10 am to 4 pm

The cost is $7 for adults, $5 for seniors (55+) and students, Members, children under 5, and those with a military ID are FREE

For more information read the full news release on the City of Marietta website.

You can watch the video interviews by following this link to the Color My Teacher Youtube page.

About the Marietta History Center

The Marietta History Center, located in the historic Kennesaw House building, has been open since 1996. The exhibits are on the second floor of the building.

The MHC website describes the history of the building (paraphrased below):

Originally built as a cotton warehouse by John Glover in 1845, the building was remodeled by Dix Fletcher to become the Fletcher House Hotel in 1855.

During the Civil War the hotel temporarily served as a makeshift hospital and morgue. For this reason, the building has become the subject of many stories and local ghost folklore. This notoriety has led to appearances on CNN, The History Channel and PBS.

The building was originally four stories high, but the top floor caught fire during the Civil War and was never rebuilt.

The Marietta History Center is located at 1 Depot Street, Marietta, GA 30060, adjacent to Marietta Square.

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