Storms approaching Cobb County from the west should reach full impact by Friday May 6

weather Cobb June 11 lightning with a Cobb County Courier logo and "hazardous weather outlook"

The storm system approaching from the west that caused the National Weather Service to issue a hazardous weather outlook for Cobb County and much of the rest of north Georgia should reach its full impact by Friday, when the chance of precipitation climbs to 80 percent, and thunderstorms are predicted.

The hazardous weather outlook states the following about the weather possible on Friday:

Isolated thunderstorms are possible on Thursday and will become more numerous on Friday as a storm system moves through. Some storms on Friday could be severe. Isolated storms may linger on Saturday and Sunday.

For a graphical demonstration of the movement of the storm front click on the animated GIF below

What are the counties expected to feel the impact?

The following Georgia counties are expected to feel the impact of the storms:

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Baldwin, Banks, Barrow, Bartow, Bibb, Bleckley, Butts, Carroll, Catoosa, Chattahoochee, Chattooga, Cherokee, Clarke, Clayton, Cobb, Coweta, Crawford, Crisp, Dade, Dawson, DeKalb, Dodge, Dooly, Douglas, Emanuel, Fannin, Fayette, Floyd, Forsyth, Gilmer, Glascock, Gordon, Greene, Gwinnett, Hall, Hancock, Haralson, Harris, Heard, Henry, Houston, Jackson, Jasper, Jefferson, Johnson, Jones, Lamar, Laurens, Lumpkin, Macon, Madison, Marion, Meriwether, Monroe, Montgomery, Morgan, Murray, Muscogee, Newton, North Fulton, Oconee, Oglethorpe, Paulding, Peach, Pickens, Pike, Polk, Pulaski, Putnam, Rockdale, Schley, South Fulton, Spalding, Stewart, Sumter, Talbot, Taliaferro, Taylor, Telfair, Toombs, Towns, Treutlen, Troup, Twiggs, Union, Upson, Walker, Walton, Warren, Washington, Webster, Wheeler, White, Whitfield, Wilcox, Wilkes, Wilkinson

What are the climate considerations of recent precipitation in the eastern states

Some climate scientists have noted a trend in which states east of the Mississippi River have been experiencing wetter weather and states to the west of the Mississippi are seeing drier weather (accompanied by an increase in severe wildfires).

Dr. Shuang-Ye Wu, Professor of Geology and Environmental Geosciences at the University of Dayton wrote an article entitled “2021’s climate disasters revealed an east-west weather divide, with one side of the country too wet, the other dangerously dry”.

In that article she wrote:

The eastern U.S. weathered storm after storm in 2021. Record rainfall in Tennessee triggered deadly flash flooding in August. The remnants of Hurricane Ida merged with another front days after the hurricane hit Louisiana and became so intense they set rainfall records and flooded subway stations and basement apartments in New York and Pennsylvania, with devastating consequences.

Almost the entire West, meanwhile, was in some stage of drought, helping to fuel wildfires that swept through forests and towns.

Excerpt from the current NWS hazardous weather outlook

The National Weather Service staff wrote in the current hazardous weather outlook:

.DAY ONE…Today and Tonight… Early morning thunderstorms will be possible across North Georgia, with occasionally frequent lightning and heavy rain as the primary threats. Isolated to scattered thunderstorms will be possible across both North and Central Georgia this afternoon. Most should remain below severe limits, but one or two strong thunderstorms cannot be ruled out. Primary threats will be heavy rain, small hail, and strong wind gusts with the strongest storms.

.DAYS TWO THROUGH SEVEN…Thursday through Tuesday… Isolated thunderstorms are possible on Thursday and will become more numerous on Friday as a storm system moves through. Some storms on Friday could be severe. Isolated storms may linger on Saturday and Sunday.

Potential hazards with any storms that develop include gusty winds, lightning, and brief periods of heavy rain. Small hail will be possible in stronger storms.

About the National Weather Service

The National Weather Service (NWS) is a part of the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA).

The NWS describes its role as follows:

The National Weather Service (NWS) provides weather, water, and climate forecasts and warnings for the United States, its territories, adjacent waters and ocean areas, for the protection of life and property and the enhancement of the national economy. These services include Forecasts and Observations, Warnings, Impact-based Decision Support Services, and Education in an effort to build a Weather-Ready Nation. The ultimate goal is to have a society that is prepared for and responds to weather, water and climate events.

Read all the Cobb County Courier climate and weather coverage by following this link.

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