Two new exhibits start April 6 at the Marietta Cobb Museum of Art

Marietta Cobb Museum of Art. Greek revival building with six large columns

The Marietta Cobb Museum of Art will host two new exhibits, and both start on April 6.

The museum is located at 30 Atlanta Street SE Marietta, GA 30060.

Initial Object by Lucy Luckovich will run from April 6 until June 16, 2024.

The event announcement on the City of Marietta website describes this exhibit as follows:

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Lucy Luckovich, an Atlanta-based artist, presents a series of paintings that allude to the concept of watching “in order to explore how female objectification has been impacted by the ongoing Digital Age.” Her work confronts the intertwining and duplicitous concepts of womanhood, consumption, and technology. Luckovich’s paintings are traditional in technique, but function within a greater conversation that is situated inside our current Digital Age. Using cherries, chains, and pearls to partially obstruct the backgrounds reinforces that each subject is presented as just an object—not a girl or a body, but the artist’s concept of an “Initial Object.”

There will be an opening reception on Saturday, April 6 from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. The reception is free for MCMA members and $10 for guests—admission is paid upon entry. Cash bar and hors d’oeuvres will be served. Membership can be purchased at the event.

Lucy Luckovich will present a free Artist Talk on Sunday, May 19 at 2:00 p.m.

The second exhibit features multiple artists, and is entitled The Magic of Modern Art: How to Love Modern & Contemporary Art.

The announcement on the City of Marietta website describes the exhibit as follows:

The Marietta Cobb Museum of Art presents The Magic of Modern Art: How to Love Modern & Contemporary Art from April 6 until June 16, 2024. Based on artist and author Robyn Jamison’s book of the same name, The Magic of Modern Art is a group exhibition of artists from across the United States. To answer the question of “How does one learn to experience Modern and Contemporary Art?,” this exhibition offers everyone the opportunity to become knowledgeable and passionate about the less-traditional side of fine art. Featuring artists from Jamison’s book and beyond, this exhibition seeks to instill the understanding that the ability to appreciate any type of art is innate to all human beings.

The artists featured in the exhibit include Kyoung Chun, Cynthia Cooper, Craig Drennen, Robyn Jamison, Joshua Kight, Aloma Marquis, Lawrence W. Oliverson, Rohitash Rao, Anthony Schmitt, Corrina Sephora, and Jamele Wright, Sr., as well as work by artists in the MCMA Permanent Collection.

The opening reception for this exhibit is on Saturday, April 6 from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m  Admission is free for MCMA members and $10 for guests—admission paid upon entry. A cash bar will be available and hors d’oeuvres will be served. Membership can be purchased at the event.

The Magic of Modern Art author and exhibiting artist, Robyn Jamison, will present a free Magic of Modern Art Tour of the exhibition, followed by a book signing on Sunday, April 7 at 1 p.m.

About the Marietta Cobb Museum of Art

The Marietta Cobb Museum of Art is housed in a building that was once a U.S. Post Office that opened in 1910.

In 1963 the main branch of the Cobb County/Marietta Public Library occupied the building.

In the early 1950s the Marietta Women’s Club formed the Fine Arts Club of Marietta.  In 1983 the name was changed to the Marietta/Cobb Fine Arts Center, and in 1986 the museum gained non-profit status and afterwards began development of the museum in its current location.

According to the Marietta Cobb Museum of Art website:

In 1989, the Main Branch of the Cobb County/Marietta Public Library vacated the Post Office building on Atlanta Street, moving into a newly erected building on Roswell Street. During this same time in September, the Marietta/Cobb Fine Arts Center changed its name to the Marietta/Cobb Museum of Art.

On April 5, 1990 the Marietta/Cobb Museum of Art officially took over the original Post Office building chosen by the Cobb County Commission.

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